Categories

CD/DVD
Do I have to pay sales tax? How can I get a resale certificate?
How are the various print methods different?
What is film output?
Do you have templates available?
Can I duplicate an audio CD that contains songs that are not mine?
Do you provide bar codes?
What factors should I consider when creating a DVD to make sure it is the most compatible with standalone players?
Do you require a minimum quantity to place an order?
What is the difference between "duplication" and "replication"

Blu-Ray
How much does Blu-Ray cost to make?
How fast can I have my Blu-Ray discs manufactured?
What is Blu-Ray?
Where does the name Blu-Ray come from?
Is a Blu-Ray disc physically larger than a standard DVD?
What are some of the features of Blu-Ray?
How much information can be put on a Blu-Ray disc?
Will my standard DVDs play on a Blu-Ray player?
Will my Blu-Ray discs play on my old DVD player?
Will my Blu-Ray disc be compatible with all Blu-Ray players?

Frequently Asked Questions

CD/DVD
Q: Do I have to pay sales tax? How can I get a resale certificate?
A: If you take delivery of your order in Illinois, and don’t have a resale certificate, you’ll need to pay sales tax. Resale certificates are issued by the state to registered businesses that resell their merchandise to distributors and retailers. A resale certificate exempts you from paying taxes on the manufactured product because those taxes will be passed on to the consumer when you collect sales tax.For more information please visit the Illinois Department of Revenue at http://tax.illinois.gov/. Note: Unless you run a full-time business that sells to distributors and retailers, a resale certificate is often difficult to obtain.

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Q: How are the various print methods different?
A:

In the CD and DVD industry, the term ‘label’ refers to the printed image on a CD or DVD. There are basically four ways to print a label:

1) Silk-screen printing and offset printing are the standard for stamped discs. Silk-screening is perfect for projects that require color matching via the Pantone Matching System (PMS). Offset printing is ideal for four-color process jobs (CMYK). Many vendors only offer one of these options...Datasis offers both silkscreen and offset printing to our customers. If you are not sure what method is best for your project, just contact us. We would be more than happy to review your artwork, and recommend the best method. 

 2) Thermal printing is a durable, professional process of adhering your image directly to the face of each disc. Thermal printing requires both special printers and special blank media in order to work. Thermal printing is the highest quality printing method available, and often exceeds the the resolution of other methods. Thermal printing also requires no dry time, and thermally printed images will not smear or peel off.

3) Paper Labels are still a favorite for user-friendly application and low cost. Kits like those made by Neato offer the capability to design simple labels, print them on your home printer, and affix them squarely and securely to any CD-R or DVD-R media. Paper labels do add an additional, albeit, small layer on top of the disc.

4) The other method available to print labels is ink-jet printing. Currently, Datasis does not offer inkjet printing because of the extra time involved in the process. Because ink is being applied to a less absorbent surface than paper, inkjet-printed discs require time to dry, and can smear if exposed to excessive moisture.
 

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Q: What is film output?
A: The term ‘film output’ which may appear on your quote is a service we provide for those customers choosing silk-screening as their printing method.  Silk-screening CDs and DVDs is much like screening t-shirts in Graphic Arts class. Screens of the image must be produced and placed on the surface for proper application of the image. A piece of film is required for each color or separation in the artwork. Film output charges are a one-time fee. Datasis keeps film positives on file for future reorders. If you ever update or change your artwork for a title we have duplicated before, film output charges would again be required.

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Q: Do you have templates available?
A: Yes, we have templates for CD and DVD printing, as well as a variety of packaging options. Please click HERE for more information. Designs not supplied on Datasis templates will incur an additional charge. We carefully check supplied files to be sure they meet our specifications. We will make minor adjustments as necessary. You will receive a proof if changes are required.

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Q: Can I duplicate an audio CD that contains songs that are not mine?
A: We take piracy very seriously. As a practicing member of IRMA (International Recording Merchants of America) Datasis will not duplicate any CD or DVD with copyrighted material on it, unless proper releases have been obtained from the copyright holder(s). We of course are more than happy to duplicate your original recordings at any time!

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Q: Do you provide bar codes?
A: We do! To sell your product in stores, you will need a barcode. To buy one yourself would cost $750 and would take several weeks. At Datasis we can provide your CD or DVD product with a genuine, unique UPC bar code that can be tracked by any distributor or retailer inventory system. Please contact your Account Executive for more information.

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Q: What factors should I consider when creating a DVD to make sure it is the most compatible with standalone players?
A:

Authoring and encoding are the most important factors impacting on compatibility (see below). Besides this, there are three other important things to keep in mind to maximize your disc's compatibility:

  1. Media. Not all DVD players can play duplicated (write-once) DVD-Rs and DVD+Rs. For maximum compatibility, consider having the discs replicated instead (see below).
  2. Regional encoding. Motion picture studios often want to control the home release of movies in different countries to guarantee the exclusivity of local distribution rights. Additionally, studios employ a strategy of staggering release dates worldwide so that a DVD release in one country does not affect the theater release of the same movie in another country. Region locks generally only apply to stamped DVDs, and they are entirely optional for the maker of a disc.
  3. Video format standards. Different countries have different formats for their television systems. The United States and Latin American countries use the 525/60 NTSC standard, whereas most other nations use the 625/50 PAL format. Although the MPEG video on DVD is stored in digital format, it is formatted for one of the two mutually incompatible television systems; therefore, there are two kinds of DVDs: "NTSC DVDs" and "PAL DVDs." (Some countries use the SECAM format, which shares the same scanning format with PAL, so discs are the same for both systems.) The differences between NTSC and PAL DVDs lie in their picture dimensions and pixel aspect ratio (720x480 NTSC vs. 720x576 PAL), display frame rate (25 frames per second NTSC vs. 29.97fps PAL), and surround audio options (Dolby Digital NTSC vs. MPEG audio for PAL). Over 95% of DVD players worldwide can play NTSC discs (with Dolby Digital audio), although the quality of video conversion varies. However, PAL discs will not work on most NTSC players. Some PCs can output converted video as a video signal for a TV, but other PCs can only display converted video on the computer monitor.

Try to test your title on a range of equipment, including earlier generation devices that may not be as broadly compatible as current generation equipment. Filmmakers wishing maximum compatibility may want to opt for DVD replication rather than duplication, to avoid using regional encoding, and to create MPEG video with the NTSC standard. Due to the multiple formats involved with compression, test as many playback platforms as possible. Once you determine your media, regional encoding, and video format, it is important to state these specifications on your package labeling.

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Q: Do you require a minimum quantity to place an order?
A: Datasis does not require a minimum number of copies to duplicate a CD or DVD. We work with each customer to recommend the best solution to their needs based on quantity, turn time, and cost.

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Q: What is the difference between "duplication" and "replication"
A: Basically those terms mean the same thing. For the sake of making things easier we use the term ‘duplication’ when we are referring to burning blank discs. We use the term ‘replication’ when we are talking about stamping discs. The end product is typically transparent to the user; however each manufacturing process does have different printing options available. Your Account Executive can explain these options to you in further detail.

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Blu-Ray
Q: How much does Blu-Ray cost to make?
A: Blu-Ray utilizes the Advanced Access Content System (AACS). This system is designed to prevent illegal copying of DVDs and its inclusion is mandatory on all Blu-Ray discs. As with Macrovision for SD DVDs, AACS has licensing and royalty fees. Datasis is fully compliant with the licensing regarding manufacture of Blu-Ray discs. Our pricing for replication always includes all applicable royalties for whatever format we are manufacturing.

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Q: How fast can I have my Blu-Ray discs manufactured?
A: Blu-Ray replication is currently running about 10-14 days.

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Q: What is Blu-Ray?
A: Blu-Ray also known as Blu-Ray disc (BD), is a next generation format developed to deliver High-Definition (HD) video content and/or large amounts of data.

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Q: Where does the name Blu-Ray come from?
A: The name Blu-Ray refers to the laser used to read the disc.  A Blu-Ray player uses a shorter wavelength blue laser as opposed to the red laser used for standard definition (SD) DVDs and CDs.

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Q: Is a Blu-Ray disc physically larger than a standard DVD?
A: No. The physical size and shape of the disc are the same as a standard DVD.

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Q: What are some of the features of Blu-Ray?
A:
  • Increased disc capacity allowing for HD video.
  • 6x the resolution of DVD with 7.1 channels of uncompressed audio.
  • New menu integration with increased interactivity and menu navigation over top of playing video.
  • Network/internet connectivity
  • Improved disc coating with increased resistance to scratches and smudges.

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Q: How much information can be put on a Blu-Ray disc?
A: A Blu-Ray disc is a single layer disc that can hold up to 25 GB (Gigabytes) of data or HD/SD video.  A BD-50 is a dual layer disc and can hold up to 50 GB of data or Video.  For a BD-25, this translates into approximately 4 hours of HD video or 11 hours of SD video.

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Q: Will my standard DVDs play on a Blu-Ray player?
A: Yes, most Blu-Ray players will be able to play standard DVDs and DVD-Rs. However, currently there are no requirements in the specification for backwards-compatibility. Backwards compatibility will be a product dependent issue.  Refer to manufacturer and model specifications for more information.

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Q: Will my Blu-Ray discs play on my old DVD player?
A: No.  Blu-Ray discs will not play on standard-definition (SD) DVD players.

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Q: Will my Blu-Ray disc be compatible with all Blu-Ray players?
A: Manufactured Blu-Ray discs should be compatible with most Blu-Ray players. However, not all machines are made equal. The format is still new and, as when standard DVD was first introduced, there are bugs to be worked out. Some older players may need firmware upgrades if there is evidence of compatibility issues. Contact the manufacturer of your player for further information.

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CD/DVD Packaging